Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Z is for Zero to Three

Posted: May 1, 2011 in Children, Education

The mission of Zero to Three is simple. It is to promote the health and development of infants and toddlers. According to the About Us section Zero to Three began because, “Neuroscientists have documented that our earliest days, weeks and months of life are a period of unparalleled growth when trillions of brain cell connections are made. Research and clinical experience also demonstrate that health and development are directly influenced by the quality of care and experiences a child has with his parents and other adults.”

Z to 3 offers care, advice, information and more about everything from promoting early language development to caring for special needs children. The mission is clear, “to inform, train, and support professionals, policymakers, and parents in their efforts to improve the lives of infants and toddlers.”

For Zero to Three it is all about infants and toddlers. Their health; physical and/or mental, is the number one priority of this national non-profit organization. For more info on what they do, how they do it and resources visit zerotothree.org.

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Rachel Ray launched Yum-O! in 2006 to help empower kids and their families develope a healthy relationship with food and cooking. The non-profit organization focuses on three key steps: Cook, Feed, Fund.

According to the Yum-O website Rachel Ray had this to say about the Cook part of the program, “We want to get parents and kids cooking healthier breakfasts, lunches, lunchboxes and dinners and we want to make food fun, fast and affordable for American families. Our goal is to get great recipes out there and to listen to parents’ and kids’ concerns about health and nutrition, and what their kids are eating both at school and at home. We want to get people really excited about getting food into our kids. The challenge I’ve heard from a lot of parents is that it’s a time and a finance issue. They just don’t really believe they can make good food fast, but they can by taking help from the store. It’s just a matter of getting information and recipes out there so that kids can learn to cook for themselves and help Mom and Dad get dinner on the table.”

Once the “Cook” part of the program is learned, explored (interactive web items help!), and utilized, the focus turns to Feed and Fund. “Feed” is all about feeding the hungry. Yum-O’s partnership with Share Our Strength (SOS) helps to raise awareness about the hunger issues in the U.S. and works to complete special projects that address the issue of hunger in America. The “Fund” part of Yum-O! focuses on giving back via education and scholarship programs.

Learn more about eating healthy right at home by checking out Rachel Ray’s Yum-O!

Xeroderma Pigmentosum is a rare genetic disorder. XP patients have extreme sensitivity to the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Those who suffer from XP have a higher risk of cancer, non-cancerous and cancerous growths on the eyes and may experience various skin conditions.

The XP Support Group was founded in 1999 in the UK by the parents of a child with XP. The group is now as UK charitable Trust that “aims to relieve the needs of persons with Xeroderma Pigmentosum and other related conditions and their families.”

Funds raised by the support group go to assisting families, research, nighttime camp activities, and grants for UV protective equipment and products. Visit the XP Support Group to learn more about Xeroderma Pigmentosum and how you can help families dealing with this disorder.

Remember to follow all the awesome blogs doing the A to Z challenge on Twitter by viewing the hashtag #atozchallenge

Bringing equality, protection, health and education services to children is what UNICEF is all about. The United Nation’s Children’s Fund is a global movement for children and the advocacy of children all over the world. With the help of national committees, country programmes, the help of volunteers and generous donations, UNICEF works to provide educational tools to children, prevent the spread of diseases like HIV/AIDs and malaria, and provides emergency humanitarian assistance during natural and man-made disasters.

UNICEF advocates for children about topics pertaining to nutrition, exercise, life skills, education, health, and so much more. They are a leader in providing care and help for children who have been abused, abandoned and become refugee’s from war ravaged countries. UNICEF gives these children a voice.

To learn more about what UNICEF has done, is doing, and will be doing in the future visit unicef.org.

T is for TRAID

Posted: April 28, 2011 in Charity, Education, Poverty

Textile Recycling for Aid and International Developement is a charity based in the UK that works to protect the environment, reduce waste and educate the public on environmental and world poverty issues. To accomplish these goals TRAID operates over 900 textile recycling banks where clothing is donated and saved from landfills to be sorted through and sold at TRAID shops.

Clothing that is damaged, stained or torn is redesigned and sold under the award-winning recycled label, TRAIDremade. When the organization members are not sorting through clothing they are raising money for expansion of recycling projects and educating the public through assemblies and workshops.

In addition to saving the environment and education the public, TRAID has been actively combatting poverty around the world. Some projects that the organization has been a part of include Africa Now, Every Child, and the Fairtrade Foundation.

To learn more about TRAID, how you can help or to make a donation visit www.traid.org.uk.

ShelterBox is there when disaster strikes to provide emergency shelters and lifesaving supplies. The International disaster relief charity that provides big, green boxes to those who have been victims of natural disasters such as when the monstrous earthquake hit Japan over six weeks ago.

Inside these green boxes are practical and urgently needed equipment. Each box contains one disaster relief tent that holds up to 10 people, a children’s pack (crayons, pens, coloring books), blankets, sheets, gloves, malaria nets, water purification systems, a tool kit (for self sufficiency), and a stove (wood burning or multi-fuel). The boxes are adapted to address the victims in different areas of the world affected by different disasters. Those experiencing devastation after a tsunami may not be affected in the same way as those who have experienced an earthquake’s devastation.

Learn how you can get involved and help ShelterBox. Check out their Young ShelterBox area too for Scouts and Teachers.

Here are some statistics that should shock you:
-Every 2 minutes someone in the U.S. is sexually assaulted.
-44% of victims that have been raped, sexually assaulted, abused or victims of incest are below the age of 18.
-In 2003, statistics showed that 1 out of 10 men have been rape victims.
-In 2003, 9 out of every 10 rape victims was female.
-93% of juvenile sexual assault victims know their attacker.

All of these statistics and more can be found at RAINN: the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network, the largest anti-sexual violence organization in the nation. RAINN provides counseling to victims, runs a sexual assault hotline (online and offline), supports victims seeking justice against their attackers, provides education on sexual violence, and is a leader in bringing national attention to sex crimes.

RAINN has helped over a million men and women who have been the victims of sexual assault by providing a National Sexual Assault Hotline that offers confidential round the clock services. If you have been the victim of rape, abuse, or sexual assault call 1-800-656-HOPE or visit rainn.org.

If you know someone who has been a victim please visit RAINN’s Help a Loved One’s page which offers advice, guidance and support.

To learn more on how to reduce the risk of assault, reporting an assault, or the laws and resources in your state regarding sex crimes visit RAINN.